Follow

How Frotcom calculates the Driving Score

Objective

The main goal of this feature is to provide a method for classifying driving behavior using a Driving score.

To classify driving behavior, all the data available in Frotcom’s database is used to calculate a referential, against which the vehicle/driver driving behavior is scored.

Calculation of the Driving score

The Driving score is a score awarded to a vehicle or a driver, which evaluates their overall driving behavior in a period of time. It is based on the following parameters:

  • Low speed acceleration,
  • High speed acceleration,
  • Low speed braking,
  • High speed braking,
  • Idling
  • Cruise control (if available)
  • RPM (if available)

It takes into consideration the entire mileage travelled during the period under analysis. It also takes into consideration the vehicle profile (driving behavior analysis by Frotcom for a truck tolerates smaller accelerations and braking, for instance, than with light vehicles).

It is important that you classify your vehicles correctly in order to have the correct results. Ask your Frotcom Certified Partner for help if you need.

How excessive acceleration is detected

Frotcom establishes, for each vehicle profile (trucks and cars have different acceleration patterns), a curve that sets the limit to the acceleration that is acceptable.

The curve is such that accelerations at low speed can be higher than at higher speeds. Similarly, accelerations for light vehicles can be higher than heavy vehicles (trucks) without infringing the limits.

If the vehicle’s acceleration exceeds that curve, an excess in acceleration is accounted for by Frotcom, negatively affecting the driving score.

By comparing the number of acceleration excesses per 100km with the typical excesses of all drivers in Frotcom, the system defines how the driving score is affected.

How excessive braking is detected

In fact braking is a negative acceleration. Frotcom uses a method similar to the one described in the previous section to detect and register excessive braking.

How excessive idling is detected

Frotcom considers that a truck or heavy vehicle idling for more than 15 mns continuously is exceeding the acceptable idling time. For light vehicles this number is lower (5 mns).

By comparing the number of minutes of excessive idling per each 100km traveled with the typical excesses of all drivers in Frotcom, for the same vehicle profile, the system defines how the driving score is affected.

How the non-use of cruise control is detected

If a vehicle is registered in Frotcom as having cruise control, Frotcom will reward the use of cruise control by the driver. To do that, Frotcom checks if the vehicle is driving at 75km/h or more for at least 5 mns.

As long as speed does not go under 75km/h, Frotcom will consider the non-use of cruise control as anti-ecodriving.

By comparing the number of minutes without using cruise control, in the situation described, per each 100km travelled, with the typical non-use excesses of all drivers in Frotcom, for the same vehicle profile, the system defines how the driving score is affected.

If you do not want cruise control to affect the driving score of your drivers, make sure to unmark the Cruise control property in each of your vehicles (under Administration > Vehicles). Frotcom will immediately stop controlling the cruise control usage.

How excessive RPM is detected

As long as your vehicles have the correct engine model associated to them (in Administration > Vehicles), Frotcom is able to detect if the RPMs read through CANBus have exceeded the recommended maximum RPM for an efficient driving.

By comparing the number of minutes with excessive RPMs, per each 100km traveled, with the typical RPM excesses of all drivers in Frotcom, for the same vehicle profile, the system defines how the driving score is affected.

 

 

Was this article helpful?
0 out of 0 found this helpful
Have more questions? Submit a request

Comments

Powered by Zendesk